Speakers

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Opening Guest Speaker
His Excellency The Honourable Peter Underwood AC
Governor of Tasmani
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His Excellency, the Honourable Peter Underwood AC was sworn in as Tasmania’s 27th Governor on 2 April 2008. He was a judge of the Supreme Court of Tasmania from 1984 until 2004 when he was appointed Chief Justice of that Court, an office he held until he assumed the Office of Governor. In addition to his commission as an Australian State Superior Court Judge, His Excellency was the Deputy President of the Australian Defence Force Discipline Appeal Tribunal from 1996 - 2007. He was the President of the Australian Institute of Judicial Administration from 2002 – 2004, and in 2007 was appointed Chair of the National Judicial College of Australia. In 2001 the University of Tasmania awarded him an honorary Doctor of Laws degree in recognition of his services to legal education, the arts and the administration of justice. In 2002 his Excellency was appointed an officer of the Order of Australia for service to the judiciary and to the law, particularly in the areas of law reform, legal education and mentoring of young practitioners, and to the community as a leader in cultural and artistic organisations in Tasmania. In 2009, Her Majesty the Queen invested His Excellency with the insignia of Companion of the Order of Australia.

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RH Clarke Lecture
Jorgen Frederiksen

Jorgen Frederiksen is CSIRO Fellow at CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research and Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science. His research interests include atmospheric dynamics, weather and seasonal climate prediction, causes of climate change, statistical dynamical closure theories of turbulent flows and subgrid scale parameterisations of turbulent eddies. Click here for further details.

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Plenary
Andrew Hogg

Dr Andrew Hogg is a physical oceanographer who works on the dynamics of global scale ocean circulation, particularly in the Southern Ocean. He comes from a physics and fluid dynamics background, and undertook postgraduate studies at the University of Western Australia. His postdoctoral years were spent at the National Oceanography Centre in UK, where he developed his work on the effect of small-scale ocean eddies upon climate. He returned to the Australian National University in 2004, where he now holds an Associate Professor position and ARC Future Fellowship.

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Plenary
Rob Massom

Rob Massom is a senior research scientist with the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC) and Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), and a member of the ACE CRC Cryosphere program. Rob has been involved in polar research since joining the Sea Ice Group of the Scott Polar Research Institute (University of Cambridge, England) in 1980, initially working in the Arctic (1980-1992) then the Antarctic (1986-present). After completing his PhD in 1989 (a detailed satellite-and drifting buoy-based analysis of an annual sea ice cycle in the Weddell Sea), he took up a postdoc fellowship at the Oceans and Ice Branch of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (USA). In 1992 he moved to Tasmania to a position at the (then) Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, before joining AAD in 2006.

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Plenary
Katrin Meissner

Katrin Meissner is an Associate Professor at the Climate Change Research Centre, University of New South Wales. She holds an ARC Future Fellowship and has affiliations with the University of Victoria, Canada (Adjunct Professor) and Oregon State University, USA (Courtesy Faculty Member). She is also an Associate Investigator of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science

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Plenary
David Thompson

David W. J. Thompson is a Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. His research is focused on the analysis and diagnosis of global climate variability using observational data. His papers have contributed to our understanding of large-scale dynamic variability and change, stratosphere/troposphere coupling, atmosphere/ocean, and the role of ozone depletion in driving long-term changes in Southern Hemisphere surface climate.

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Priestley Medal Winner 2013
Matthew Wheeler

Matt is a senior research scientist in the Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research (CAWCR) at the Bureau of Meteorology. His Ph.D. was obtained in 1998 at the University of Colorado in Boulder with a thesis on "convectively-coupled equatorial waves", which dealt with the theory and observations of the waves as revealed primarily by spectral analysis. After a postdoc at NCAR in the Advanced Study Program, Matt joined the Bureau in 2000 where he has worked primarily on the Madden Julian Oscillation, the Australian monsoon, and subseasonal to seasonal prediction.